Twice in a Blue Moon by Christina Lauren

Publication Date: October 22, 2019
Publisher: Gallery Books
Rating: ★★

Sam Brandis was Tate Jones’s first: Her first love. Her first everything. Including her first heartbreak.

During a whirlwind two-week vacation abroad, Sam and Tate fell for each other in only the way that first loves do: sharing all of their hopes, dreams, and deepest secrets along the way. Sam was the first, and only, person that Tate—the long-lost daughter of one of the world’s biggest film stars—ever revealed her identity to. So when it became clear her trust was misplaced, her world shattered for good.

Fourteen years later, Tate, now an up-and-coming actress, only thinks about her first love every once in a blue moon. When she steps onto the set of her first big break, he’s the last person she expects to see. Yet here Sam is, the same charming, confident man she knew, but even more alluring than she remembered. Forced to confront the man who betrayed her, Tate must ask herself if it’s possible to do the wrong thing for the right reason… and whether “once in a lifetime” can come around twice.

With Christina Lauren’s signature “beautifully written and remarkably compelling” (Sarah J. Maas, New York Times bestselling author) prose and perfect for fans of Emily Giffin and Jennifer Weiner, Twice in a Blue Moon is an unforgettable and moving novel of young love and second chances.

Review:

This book made me sad. Not for the plot, but because normally, Christina Lauren’s reads are four-to-five star books in my opinion. This one just fell flat and I’m sad because of it.

I read before that this book was not going to be like their other ones. Normally, Christina Lauren’s books have me bursting into laughter while swooning over the romance. Twice in a Blue Moon was very, very different. I’m a huge fan of reuniting and friends-to-lovers, but there was just a lot wrong.

There was barely any development and conflict for the amount that was going on within this book. It’s supposed to be a fourteen-year difference and I looked at the characters like they should be pretty different than they used to be. Tate did change quite a bit, no longer a girl that lets everyone walk over her and becomes assertive. However, I still feel like there wasn’t enough of a development to allow a better rating.

Sam and Tate were unlikable characters and I’m not sorry to say that. I’ve read most of Christina Lauren’s novels and these characters did not have any of the charm or wit that the characters usually possess. The connection wasn’t really there and even it seemed that the smutty parts (which is so good in their other books) really wasn’t all there. It seemed as though once something started to get going, it just ended abruptly and moved on to the next part of the story.

I just love Christina Lauren so much that they have my heart and high ratings. Their stories and words just flow so beautifully usually, and that’s why it pains me that I didn’t like this book. If I had to put Twice in a Blue Moon into one word, it would be forgettable.

Would Like to Meet by Rachel Winters

Publication Date: December 3, 2019
Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons
Rating: ★★

After seven years as an assistant, 29-year-old Evie Summers is ready to finally get the promotion she deserves. But now the TV and film agency she’s been running behind the scenes is in trouble, and Evie will lose her job unless she can convince the agency’s biggest and most arrogant client, Ezra Chester, to finish writing the script for a Hollywood romantic comedy.

The catch? Ezra is suffering from writer’s block–and he’ll only put pen to paper if singleton Evie can prove to him that you can fall in love like they do in the movies. With the future of the agency in jeopardy, Evie embarks on a mission to meet a man the way Sally met Harry or Hugh Grant met Julia Roberts.

But in the course of testing out the meet-cute scenes from classic romantic comedies IRL, not only will Evie encounter one humiliating situation after another, but she’ll have to confront the romantic past that soured her on love. In a novel as hilarious as it is heartwarming, debut author Rachel Winters proves that sometimes real life is better than the movies–and that the best kind of meet-cutes happen when you least expect them.

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Rachel Winters & G.P. Putnam’s Sons for a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

When I read the synopsis of Would Like to Meet, I was super interested right away. It sounded like something I’ve never read before and I am an absolute sucker for contemporary romance stories. When I started, I thought it was pretty good. I kept reading and reading and at this point, I was just begging for something to happen. Ultimately, there were good parts of this story, but I feel like most of it fell flat for me.

I will say that Rachel Winters had a particular style of writing. I don’t think it was bad necessarily, but I could absolutely see this being more of a play/screenplay type of story instead of a book. The characters, the premise, everything had so much promise, but as a book, I’m not sure that was the right path.

I am someone who is painfully particular about the characters in a book. I really tried, but I had a really hard time with the main characters, Evie and Ezra. I feel as though Ezra was so unlikable after 60% or so, but I will give props that Rachel Winters was able to make me feel those feelings for him. Evie was kind of self-centered and as I was reading, I kept thinking, “she does not deserve her friends…like at all”. Anette and Ben were the only reasons why I got through. There were some moments that I laughed-out-loud, because of Anette specifically.

Would Like to Meet had a ton of potential, but I feel as though the story was just cliche for me. The characters were unlikable and just not able to be related to. I really liked the idea and I think that if there were more likable moments in this novel that it would easily be a good book.